Home Definition Integer Examples Explained: What is an Integer?

Integer Examples Explained: What is an Integer?

by Marcin Wieclaw
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what is an integer example

An integer is a whole number that can be positive, negative, or zero. It is an essential concept in mathematics and plays a significant role in various fields, including algebra, number theory, and computer programming.

Examples of integers include -5, 1, 5, 8, 97, and 3,043. These numbers represent complete quantities without fractional or decimal parts.

On the other hand, numbers that are not integers include -1.43, 1 3/4, 3.14, .09, and 5,643.1. These numbers have fractional or decimal components.

The set of integers, denoted as Z, includes all the positive and negative whole numbers along with zero. It is an infinite set that extends both in the positive and negative directions on the number line.

Unknown or unspecified integers are often represented by lowercase, italicized letters such as p, q, r, and s. This notation is commonly used in mathematical equations and formulas.

The set of integers is denumerable, meaning it can be listed in a way that implies the identity of every element in the set. This property allows for precise calculations and analysis.

Moreover, the elements of Z can be paired off one-to-one with the elements of the set of natural numbers. This pairing establishes a correspondence between integers and the counting numbers.

Types of Integers

Integers can be grouped into three categories: zero, positive integers, and negative integers.

Zero: Zero is neither positive nor negative and is represented as 0.

Positive Integers: Positive integers are natural counting numbers greater than zero, such as 1, 2, 3, and so on.

Negative Integers: Negative integers are the negative counterparts of natural numbers, such as -1, -2, -3, and so on.

Arithmetic Operations on Integers

Integers offer a wide range of possibilities when it comes to arithmetic operations. Whether it’s addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division, integers can be manipulated to yield precise results. Let’s explore the rules and principles governing these operations.

Addition

When adding integers with the same sign, you simply add their absolute values and preserve the sign. For instance, (-5) + (-3) = -8, while 4 + 7 = 11.

When dealing with integers of different signs, you subtract their absolute values and assign the sign of the integer with the larger absolute value. For example, (-7) + 12 = 5, and (-9) + 6 = -3.

Subtraction

Subtraction of integers can be converted to addition by changing the sign of the second number and following the rules for addition. For instance, 8 – (-3) becomes 8 + 3 = 11.

Multiplication

Multiplication of integers follows a simple rule: if both integers have the same sign, the product is positive; if they have different signs, the product is negative. For example, 4 x (-2) = -8, while (-3) x (-5) = 15.

Division

Similar to multiplication, division of integers adheres to a specific rule: if both integers have the same sign, the quotient is positive; if they have different signs, the quotient is negative. For instance, 14 ÷ 2 = 7, while (-12) ÷ 3 = -4.

With these rules in mind, manipulating integers becomes a straightforward process, enabling precise calculations and accurate results.

Properties of Integers

Integers possess various important properties that govern their behavior in mathematical operations. Understanding these properties is essential for working with integers effectively.

The closure property of integers states that whenever two integers are added, subtracted, or multiplied, the result will always be an integer. This property ensures that the set of integers is closed under these operations.

The commutative property states that the order of integers does not affect the result of addition or multiplication. In other words, changing the order of the integers being added or multiplied does not change the outcome. For example, 2 + 3 is the same as 3 + 2, and 4 × 6 is the same as 6 × 4.

The associative property of integers indicates that changing the grouping of integers does not impact the result of addition or multiplication. This means that when performing multiple operations on integers, the grouping can be modified without changing the final outcome. For instance, (2 + 3) + 4 is equivalent to 2 + (3 + 4), and (5 × 6) × 7 is equivalent to 5 × (6 × 7).

FAQ

What is an integer?

An integer is a whole number that can be positive, negative, or zero. Examples of integers include -5, 1, 5, 8, 97, and 3,043.

What types of integers are there?

Integers can be grouped into three categories: zero, positive integers, and negative integers. Zero is neither positive nor negative, while positive integers are natural counting numbers greater than zero and negative integers are the negative counterparts of natural numbers.

What arithmetic operations can be done on integers?

Integers can be used in various arithmetic operations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. There are rules to follow for each operation, such as adding integers with the same sign or different signs, converting subtraction to addition, and determining the sign of the product or quotient in multiplication or division.

What properties do integers have?

Integers have several properties, including the closure property, commutative property, associative property, distributive property, additive inverse property, multiplicative inverse property, and identity property. These properties govern how integers behave in mathematical operations and relationships.

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